Profile digital

  • Alice and Louise are sisters united by a distant tragedy - the house fire fourteen years ago which their brother lit and burned to death in. Alice teaches dirt-poor students at a state high school that the government wants to close, while pursuing a relationship with a married man. Louise, a habitual liar and recovering heroin addict, has been playing a game of dares - 'the danger game' - with herself since she was a child, and she now can't stop. When they reunite in Melbourne to unravel the truth about their twin brother's death, and seek out the mother who abandoned them as children, they're forced to face the danger of their family's past.

  • We spend our days catching buses and trains, tapping away at computers, shopping, queuing, lying on sofas. But we know almost nothing about these activities. Exploring the history of these subjects as they come up during a typical day, the author shows that they conceal all kinds of hidden histories and meanings.

  • Anglais Body Count

    Peter Gill

    Reveals how politicians and religious leaders in both the rich and poor worlds have failed in their duty to protect their people from AIDS. Tracing the history of AIDS since its discovery in 1981, this book argues that simple messages about safe sex and condoms have been consistently downplayed out of embarrassment or misplaced moral fervour.

  • In an age when science is supposed to be king, scientists are beset by experimental results they simply cannot explain. But, if the past is anything to go by, these anomalies contain the seeds of future scientific revolutions. This title surveys the outer-limits of human knowledge.

  • The perfect gift book for the power hungry (and who doesn't want power?) at an excellent price. The Concise Edition of an international bestseller. At work, in relationships, on the street or on the 6 o'clock news: the 48 Laws apply everywhere. For anyone with an interest in conquest, self-defence, wealth, power or simply being an educated spectator, The 48 Laws of Power is one of the most useful and entertaining books ever. This book 'teaches you how to cheat, dissemble, feign, fight and advance your cause in the modern world.' (Independent on Sunday) The distilled wisdom of the masters - illustrated through the tactics, triumphs and failures from Elizabeth I to Henry Kissinger on how to get to the top and stay there. Wry, ironic and clever this is an indispensable and witty guide to power. The laws are now famous:- Law 1: Never outshine the master Law 2: Never put too much trust in friends; learn how to use enemies Law 3: Conceal your intentions Law 4: Always say less than necessary

  • Offers the strategies of war that can help us gain mastery in the modern world. Spanning world civilisations, and synthesising dozens of political, philosophical, and religious texts, this comprehensive guide focuses on the subtle social game of everyday life.

  • Anglais Mojo

    Marshall Goldsmith

    Mojo is the concept of positive momentum: success building upon success. It anchors our self-esteem, shapes our careers and influences those around us. This title addresses the vital phases of gaining, retaining and recapturing mojo. It focuses on the importance of organisational momentum and explains what leaders must do to foster it.

  • Nations are not trapped by their pasts, but events that happened hundreds or even thousands of years ago continue to exert huge influence on present-day politics. This title examines the paths that different societies have taken to reach their current forms of political order.

  • Anglais Just My Type

    Simon Garfield

    Just My Type is not just a font book, but a book of stories. About how Helvetica and Comic Sans took over the world. About why Barack Obama opted for Gotham, while Amy Winehouse found her soul in 30s Art Deco. About the great originators of type, from Baskerville to Zapf, or people like Neville Brody who threw out the rulebook, or Margaret Calvert, who invented the motorway signs that are used from Watford Gap to Abu Dhabi. About the pivotal moment when fonts left the world of Letraset and were loaded onto computers ... and typefaces became something we realised we all have an opinion about.As the Sunday Times review put it, the book is'a kind ofEats, Shoots and Leaves for letters, revealing the extent to which fonts are not only shaped by but also define the world in which we live.'

  • Anglais Secret Affairs

    Mark Curtis

    Shows how Britain has helped create the Islamic terrorism that now threatens us. From the overthrow of Iran's popular government during the 1950s and the rise of the Muslim Brotherhood in Syria, to Libya, Kosovo, Afghanistan and Saudi Arabia's ruthless internal oppression, this book reveals Britain's hidden hand in the rise of global terrorism.

  • Anglais The Small Hand

    Susan Hill

    Returning home late one summer's evening, antiquarian bookseller Adam Snow takes a wrong turning and stumbles across the derelict old White House. Compelled by curiosity, he approaches the door, and, standing before the entrance feels the unmistakeable sensation of a small hand creeping into his own, 'as if a child had taken hold of it'.

  • Anglais We-Think

    Charles Leadbeater

    Society is based not on mass consumption now but on mass, innovative participation - as is clear in phenomena from Wikipedia, Youtube and Craigslist to forms of scientific research and political campaigning. This book discusses about what the rise of these phenomena means for the way we organise ourselves.

  • Anglais The Answers

    Lucy Kellaway

    Whether it's a problem of working with an ex-lover, firing a litigious employee or dealing with accusations of racism, this book offers practical advice on negotiating the minefield of modern office. It is suitable for those who are trying to cope with troublesome co-workers.

  • Anglais Free Radicals

    Michael Brooks

    Science is a highly competitive and ruthless discipline, and only its most determined and passionate practitioners make headlines - and history. This title explores some of the greatest breakthroughs in science, revealing the extreme lengths some scientists go to in order to make their theories public.

  • Which battle was fought 'For England, Harry and St George'? Who demanded to be painted 'warts and all'? What - and when - was the Battle of the Bulge? In this title", the author answers all these questions - and more - as he tells the tumultuous story of a fascinating nation.

  • When the writer, Oxford scholar and photographer John Jameson visits the home of his vicar friend, he is entranced by Daisy, his youngest daughter. Jameson charms her with his wit and child-like imagination, teasing her with riddles and inventing humorous stories as they enjoy afternoons alone by the river and in his rooms.



    The shocking impact of this unusual friendship is only brought to light when, years later, Daisy, unsettled in her marriage, rediscovers her childhood diaries hidden in an old toy chest.



    Inspired by the tender and troubling friendship between Lewis Carroll and Alice Liddell, After Such Kindness demonstrates Gaynor Arnold's extraordinary 'capacity to imagine the truth behind the facts'. With the same assured feel for the Victorian period displayed in her prize-listed debut, Arnold brings to scintillating life an idiosyncratic genius and his timeless muse.

  • Anglais City State

    David Kynaston

    An engaging account of the rise and dominance of the City of London, arguably the most important phenomenon of British history in the last 300 years. 'The City today is the most dynamic and world-beating sector of the British economy. Increasingly, it is the City that calls the shots. More than ever, governments and industry are constrained in their conduct by the fear of the judgement of the financial markets. This book looks back over the past 20 years and examines the extraordinary rise of this economic entity that is the City of London.

  • Anglais Cleopatra

    Joyce Tyldesley

    She was the last ruler of the Macedonian dynasty of Ptolemies who had ruled Egypt for three centuries. Highly educated (she was the only one of the Ptolemies to read and speak ancient Egyptian as well as the court Greek) and very clever (her famous liaisons with Julius Caesar and Mark Antony were as much to do with politics as the heart), she steered her kingdom through impossibly taxing internal problems and railed against greedy Roman imperialism. Stripping away preconceptions as old as her Roman enemies, Joyce Tyldesley uses all her skills as an Egyptologist to give us this magnificent biography.

  • The Colosseum was Imperial Rome's monument to warfare. Like a cathedral of death it towered over the city and invited its citizens, 50,000 at a time, to watch murderous gladiatorial games. It is now visited by two million visitors a year (Hitler was among them). Award winning classicist, Mary Beard with Keith Hopkins, tell the story of Rome's greatest arena: how it was built; the gladiatorial and other games that were held there; the training of the gladiators; the audiences who revelled in the games, the emperors who staged them and the critics. And the strange after story - the Colosseum has been fort, store, church, and glue factory.

  • The rise of China and India will be the outstanding development of the 21st century, raising fundamental questions about both the structure of the world economy and the balance of global geopolitical power. Will China still be a repressive and undemocratic regime, embracing free market economics but only when it suits? How aggressive a superpower will it be? And what about India, whose huge and growing population and economic prospects appear to guarantee prosperity? David Smith analyses the ways in which the world is tilting rapidly Eastwards, and examines all the implications of the shift in global power to Beijing, Delhi and Washington - a shift that will creep up on us before we know it.

  • We might think that the world's oil empires are invincible megaliths, dominated by American interests, but Duncan Clarke reveals the ways in which these empires will face huge challenges in the twenty-first century. Based on razor-sharp analysis of contemporary geopolitics and a deep knowledge of global history, he shows exactly why these empires are declining. He explains where the new empires of oil will be around the world; which of the hidden threats and unknown enemies are and will be the most serious; and where companies have gone wrong and can improve their global strategies. Empires of Oil reveals how the world will change because of global battles over the commodity that underpins our lives.

  • As a Chinese proverb says 'The fish rots from the head' and so it is with businesses and other organisations - the buck starts and stops in the boardroom. This third edition of Bob Garratt'sbestselling book that highlights the importance of effectivecorporate governance has been extensively updated following the corporate scandals of the early 2000s - Enron, WorldCom, Tyco - and the abysmal boardroom standards that the recent credit crunch and ensuing global financial crisis brought to light.



    This new edition builds on the Learning Board model developed by the author and now widely used internationally by corporations and public sector organisations such as the NHS. The result is a thought-provoking and highly practical book that will be invaluable to all those with responsibility for corporate governance - and also those who subject them to scrutiny.



    What Sir Adrian Cadbury, whose committee's groundbreaking report on corporate governance was published nearly twenty years ago, said about the first edition remains as true today as ever:'No director can afford to ignore this book'.

  • There are few more historic and evocative places in the world. Caesar was cremated there. Charles V and Mussolini rode by it in triumph. There Napoleon celebrated his festival of liberty. In this radical reappraisal David Watkin teaches us to see the Forum with new eyes and helps us to rediscover its rich history. This is as stimulating to the armchair traveller as it is useful as a guide to the Forum itself.



    'With verve, authority and no little humour, Watkin tells the detailed and complex story of this great but mutilated landmark ... it is an almost impossible task, superbly done' Peter Jones, BBC History Magazine 'In this sprightly volume ... the distinguished architectural historian David Watkin charts the shifting fortunes of the site ... he has an engagingly romantic feeling for the place... deploying a good deal of sharp wit, he reveals how the relatively recent obsession with recovering the Forum's classical past has led to much unhappy destruction and much less scarcely happy invention' Matthew Sturgis, Country Life

  • This entertaining and endlessly surprising book takes us on an exploration into every aspect of Japanese society from the most public to the most intimate. A series of meticulous investigations gradually uncovers the multi-faceted nature of a country and people who are even more extraordinary than they seem. Our journey encompasses religion, ritual, martial arts, manners, eating, drinking, hot baths, geishas, family, home, singing, wrestling, dancing, performing, clans, education, aspiration, sexes, generations, race, crime, gangs, terror, war, kindness, cruelty, money, art, imperialism, emperor, countryside, city, politics, government, law and a language that varies according to whom you are speaking. Clear-sighted, persistent, affectionate, unsentimental and honest - Alan Macfarlane shows us Japan as it has never been seen before.

empty